kibitz!



this is a yiddish word!:

kibitz \KIB-its\ , verb;
1. T
o chat; converse.

2. To look on and offer unwanted, usually meddlesome advice to others.
Quotes:
The servers, too, hit the right tone for a neighborhood restaurant — not afraid to
kibitz a little when they see you’re open to it, but respectful of your time and your time with your tablemates. — Jonathan Kauffman, “At Frances, sometimes less is less,” SF Weekly
Origin:
It derives from the Yiddish
kibetsn, which is equivalent to the German kiebitzen, “to look on at cards.”


And this is from a true yiddish dictionary:
kibitz  v. Yiddish (KIB-its)  1. To fool around, joke, or make wisecracks, particularly while others are trying to work or be serious. “Enough kibitzing! Will you get out of my office already? I have to finish this work.” 2. To give unsolicited but good-natured advice. The word was originally used to describe a spectator at a card game, who would make comments and give advice. “My father-in-law always kibitzes about what I serve for dinner. He wants a fancy dessert.”  n. kibitzer  One who kibitzes. Joyce Eisenberg, Ellen Scolnic and Jewish Publication Society, The JPS Dictionary of Jewish Words (Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society, 2001), 81.

thanks to J for the yiddish dictionary!
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